Disability Lawyers

Will My Disability Benefits Be Reduced if I Get Workers’ Compensation or Other Public Disability Benefits?

The governing regulations for receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) Benefits can be complicated. While disabled workers are entitled to everything allowed, certain stipulations can affect your total benefit amount. Before you jeopardize your SSDI benefits or run afoul of the regulations, contact Disability Lawyer Samuel E. Earley for seasoned guidance about receiving other forms of disability benefits.

Workers’ Compensation

Workers’ Compensation is a form of insurance paid for by an employer to cover expenses incurred when an employee becomes injured on the job or contracts an illness while involved in job-related activity. Workers who become partially or completely disabled due to job-related circumstances can be eligible for different levels of disability payments.

If you receive both SSDI disability benefits and Workers’ Compensation disability benefits, the amount of your SSDI benefits can be reduced.

Public Disability Benefits

Public disability benefits are payments you receive because of disabling medical conditions that are not job-related, and that are paid by a federal, state or local government entity. Some examples include civil service disability benefits or state and local disability benefits that are part of a retirement plan.

If you receive both SSDI disability benefits and some forms of public disability benefits, the amount of your SSDI benefits can be reduced.

However, certain public disability benefits do not count against your SSDI benefit calculations. Some examples include:

  • VA benefits
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
  • State & local benefits, if you paid SS taxes on those earnings

Private Disability Benefits

Private disability benefits are payments or settlements you receive from private, non-government-related sources. Some examples include pensions or private insurance policies.

Any private disability benefits do not affect your SSDI benefits.

Calculating Your Reduction in Benefits

The general rule from the Social Security Administration basically says that if you receive Workers’ Compensation disability benefits or public disability benefits and SSDI benefits, your combined amount cannot exceed 80% of your average current earnings before you became disabled.

For example: Your last average current earnings were $5,000 per month before you became disabled. You receive $2,500 per month in SSDI benefits and $2,000 per month from Workers’ Compensation. This total is $4,500 per month, which is more than 80% of your last average current earnings amount (80% x $5,000 = $4,000). Your total disability income is $500 over the limit; therefore, your SSDI benefits will be reduced by $500 per month.

Lump sum disability payments can also affect your monthly SSDI payments. Be sure to inform the SSA of any lump sum disability payments or settlements.

Get All the Benefits to Which You Are Entitled

Disability Lawyer Sam Earley believes that every disabled worker should receive the full number of benefits to which they are entitled, from every source. As a seasoned SSDI attorney, Sam regularly helps disabled persons navigate the complicated bureaucracy and regulations of the Social Security Administration in order to get the full measure of what they deserve. There are many variables involved in calculating and receiving disability benefits, and every person’s situation is unique. This is why you deserve the personalized attention Sam and his team provide.

Get Help with SSDI Disability Benefits and Medical Reviews

Receiving SSDI benefits while receiving other disability benefits is possible, but there are complex rules that can cause your SSDI payments to be reduced, depending on what type of benefits you receive. Sam Earley can help you decide which benefits are best and how to receive the largest amount possible under the law. Plus, he can help when its time for periodic medical reviews and other evaluations of your condition that relate to your benefits. Contact Disability Lawyer Sam Earley today for seasoned and practical assistance with your disability benefits.

Contact Our Disability Lawyers

You may qualify to continue receiving SSDI benefits while also receiving other forms of disability assistance, but you need a seasoned SSDI attorney to help you navigate the complex regulations of the system. Call Social Security Disability Attorney Sam Earley at 770-881-7171 or complete our online contact form.